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Auburn Tigers 2020 NFL Draft Scouting Report

This is a season of transition at Jordan-Hare Stadium. Gone are some key players at key positions such as QB Jarrett Stidham, WR Darius Slayton and CB Jamel Dean who were three of the six total players drafted in the 2019 Draft. But of course there are talented replacements for each player. It won’t be easy replacing a QB who was a dual threat and 4th round draft pick but there are supremely talented young players more than capable of taking the reigns. They returned a lot of talent as well so hope isn’t lost. They have a veteran offensive line and a very talent defensive line and LB corp. This team will be in the fight for SEC West supremacy once again.

#13 Javaris Davis (rSr.) CB/NCB 5-10 180. Has appeared in 36 games with 28 starts. Has NFL bloodlines. Cousins Vernon Davis (currently active) was selected 6th overall in the 2006 NFL Draft by the San Francisco 49ers and Vontae Davis (now retired) was the 25th pick in the 1st round of the 2009 NFL Draft by the Miami Dolphins. A two sport athlete. Runs track and field as well as playing football. Versatile. Has experience at both field and boundary CB positions as well as NCB. Excellent athlete. Extremely fast. Reportedly ran a 4.24 40 during spring testing. Has quick twitch ability. Has excellent agility, mobility and flexibility. Flips his hips seamlessly and extremely quick. Has zero stiffness in any of his movements. Has really good technique. Has very fast feet in his backpedal off of the line. Has great balance. Springs out of his backpedal forward. Very smooth in his bail technique. Gets good depth in his drops. Sticks to his man like glue in man coverage. Shows textbook ability to recover in close quarters at the line in press coverage (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 8:40 mark and vs. Ole Miss 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:05 mark). Triangulates between the QB and the receiver well in off coverage. Sees the ball well and closes fast downhill on short and drag routes. Every pass in his direction is contested. Gives up minimal yards after the catch. A solid tackler. Very aggressive in his approach to taking the ball carrier/receiver down. Shows good bend around the edge as a pass rusher (vs. Purdue 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:38 mark).

Missed three games in 2017 due to injury. Suffered a right hamstring injury against Mercer and missed the following weeks game against Missouri on September 23, 2017. Missed games against Ole Miss and Arkansas respectively on October 7, 2017 and October 21, 2017 due to the same issue. Suffered a left ankle injury and only played during the opening kickoff against Texas A & M on November 3, 2018. Missed the weeks following game against Georgia on November 10, 2018 as well due to the ankle injury. A NCB only. Has less than ideal size. Undersized in both the height and weight categories. Has small bone structure. Has thin arms, legs and calves. Doesn’t have much growth potential. Lacks functional football strength as a run defender. Gets dominated on the perimeter by blockers as a run defender at times (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & Goal at the 10:43 mark, vs. Alabama 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:04 mark and vs. Alabama 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:47 mark). Runs a bit upright in his backpedal. Tends to grab and hold unnecessarily downfield when the ball is in the air. Impedes the receivers route running at times. Doesn’t locate the ball in the air consistently. Loses track while running stride for stride and will grab and pull on the receiver (vs. LSU 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:57 mark, vs. Ole Miss 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 6:19 mark, vs. Ole Miss 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 13 at the 10:20 mark and vs. Alabama 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 15 at the 11:36 mark). Has been flagged for pass interference as a result on a number of occasions. Loses track when running stride for stride with a receiver.

His athleticism is extremely impressive. He’s about as slick and smooth a mover as they come in his hip flexibility and footwork. He has great speed and jumping ability as well. He can recover from nearly any mistake he may make to close in on the ball at the last moment. Although he appears to run closer to a 4.35 40 than a 4.24 he should be at the top or very near it in all the speed and agility drills at the Combine. The buzz should pick up earlier at the Senior Bowl if he’s a participant. There is a ceiling on how high he can be drafted because he’s such a small player. He’s a NCB only as a next level prospect. As a player who will be 23 years old by draft day his size and strength are where he’s going to be so he’s maybe maxed out in those areas. He may add about 5-10 pounds during the draft process to improve his size but he shouldn’t gain more as to not affect his athleticism in any way. His ball skills with the ball in the air downfield won’t help his cause as an early rounder and neither will the pass interference penalties if he continues to be too hands on downfield. He has the versatility as a glue type cover CB to play on the outside but his size will prevent that. He has the quick twitch capability to be a great NCB and either take away and/or minimize the receivers yards after the catch especially on third downs. He’s a top of the 1st round player if he’s 6-0 200 pounds but since he isn’t he’s great value later. Mid 3rd-early 5th round.

#20 Jeremiah Dinson (rSr.) FS/CB 6-0 191. Has appeared in 36 games with - starts. Versatile. Has experience at CB, NCB, FS as well as SS. A very cerebral player. Has a high football IQ. Has a mind for the game. The QB of the defense. Can diagnose plays very quickly. Has good strength as a run defender. Can hold his ground at times against OL. Doesn’t get pushed back when close to the LOS. Can stack, shed and discard blockers (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:24 mark). Can slip a block as well and make a play on the ball (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:54 mark). Has good tackling technique. Uses good form when bringing down receivers and RB’s.

Suffered a devastating season ending injury against Texas A& M on November 7, 2015. Suffered a dislocated left knee, three torn ligaments in his left knee as well as a dislocated left shoulder. Took a medical redshirt for the 2016 season while recovering from two separate surgeries. Suffered a right shoulder injury during Auburn’s spring game in April of 2018 that required surgery. He returned to fall practice of 2018. Doesn’t possess top flight athleticism. Isn’t a quick twitch athlete. Isn’t very agile. Has stiff hips in man coverage (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & Goal at the 10:15 mark and vs. Ole Miss 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & Goal at the 9:45 mark). Takes an extra step when moving from one direction to the other (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:28 mark). Almost like a reset. Has a deliberate and isn’t swift in his backpedal. Doesn’t get good depth. Doesn’t spring forward out of his backpedal. Lacks range as a centerfielder. Doesn’t have the speed to make plays on the ball over the top (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:34 mark and vs. Tennessee 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 12:23 mark). Isn’t an instinctive pass defender. Doesn’t anticipate where the QB is going with the ball (vs. LSU 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:57 mark). Misses his share of open field tackles. Doesn’t break down well in space (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:15 mark).

His abilities are really strong and well suited towards playing closer to the LOS. He’s a really good run defender with strong tackling skills. He’s not a player who does well in coverage however. He never seems to be around the ball or where it’s going as a pass defender. He even inexplicably can get beaten off of the LOS and hold a TE in the end zone (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & Goal at the 11:04 mark). He lost a good deal of his athleticism with the left knee injury suffered in November of 2015 and all indications are that it’s finally coming back after having a good showing during spring practices. He has to show himself to be a more athletic player in order to be a viable next level prospect. He needs to test extremely well at Auburn’s Pro Day in his speed and agility drills in order to garner further next level interest. With his lack of fluidity however he more than likely won’t test as well as he needs to. His lack of coverage skill has less to do with the injury to begin with so he’s more of a box safety anyway. UDFA.

#71 Jack Driscoll (rSr.) RT 6-5 296. Has appeared in 33 games with 32 starts. Graduate transfer from UMass. Versatile. Has experience at LT, LG and RT. Good athlete. Has really good balance and coordination in all of his movements. Very sound in his technique. Does a good job of keeping his pad level down. Wins the leverage battle. Has good hand placement on DL. Uses good footwork. Isn’t trudging or plodding in his kick slide (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 4 at the 13:15 mark). Understands angles in blocking. Adjusts his footwork accordingly to keep defenders away from the play. Get to his spot against speed rushers attacking his outside shoulder. Rides them past the QB on their outside rush (vs. Georgia 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 10:33 mark). Locks on with strong hands. Keeps the DE/OLB at bay with a strong left hand when they try to use an outside/inside move as a pass rusher (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:10 mark). Works very well in tandem with his RG. Very conscience of all defenders that come into his zone. Keeps his head on a swivel. Will engage in a combination block while also looking for other defenders (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:19 mark). Latches on at a good rate on the second level. Doesn’t lunge when attempting to block LB’s and S’s on the second level.

Suffered a left knee injury (undisclosed) against Southern Mississippi on September 29, 2018. Missed the following game against Mississippi State on October 6, 2018. Aggravated the left knee on October 20, 2018 against Ole Miss. Isn’t a smooth mover when facing speed off of the edge. Has a quick type of gallop out of his stance and into his kick slide Will overcommit all of his weight at times to his outside as a pass protector (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 11 at the 3:00 mark). Will either whiff or lunge when defenders use a swim move or any move that requires a change of movement or speed (vs. Georgia 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 1:34 mark). Gets walked back into the pocket when defenders use a bull rush. Doesn’t have ideal size for an OL. Doesn’t play with a great deal of functional football strength. Isn’t a powerful run blocker. Doesn’t get good push at the snap in goal line situations. Doesn’t have a strong hand punch or jolt DL off of the ball. Defenders tend to slide out of his clutches when engaged. Doesn’t get good push on LB’s and S’s when pulling on the second level.

He’s a solid athlete. His coordination is really good for a player his size. Has enough ability and next level upside to remain at RT but might be better served as an interior OL. Has a solid skill set that makes him a better OG like his sound technique and pulling ability. Has enough athleticism to fill in at LT in an emergency. His versatility with being able to play four OL positions is very appealing and only enhances his value as a next level prospect. He could really use add muscle mass to better combat against strength and aid in his own strength gains but he actually lost weight from the end of the 2018 season to spring practices. He’d be better served adding about 15-20 pounds of muscle to get up to 315. He really needs it because his size current size won’t get him drafted with the intentions of him being a starter but instead a utility player. He should test well in OL drills at the Combine but his strength testing is what will determine where he’s drafted. He’ll never be a power player but he could become a player who could get some movement as opposed to a player who doesn’t get any. 6th-UDFA.

#77 Marquel Harrell (rSr.) LG 6-3 309. Has appeared in 30 games with 19 starts. Has really good size for the position. Has long arms and a solid frame. Plays with good technique. Keeps his pad level down after the snap. Good athlete. Shows good movement and agility. Can get out on the move and block in space (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 5:54 mark). Isn’t a stiff mover. Really coordinated. Latches on successfully at the second level at times. Gets to the LB level as a run blocker without lunging or overextending. Has good awareness as a zone blocker for the most part. Keeps his head on a swivel. Keeps his feet moving when engaged in a block as a pass blocker.

Doesn’t have great functional football strength. Isn’t a man mover or mauler in the running game. Lacks heavy hands once engaged with a DL or LB. Doesn’t have a strong hand punch. Doesn’t really alter a defenders course even when engaged. Doesn’t have great foot speed. Only capable of running a really tight or narrow pull. Rises straight up out of his stance on pulls. Doesn’t latch on at a high rate on pulls. A bit slow footed. Shows slow lateral movement in his footwork. Will at times allow a defender under his pads. Gets bull rushed back into the pocket and can’t reanchor (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 2 at the 4:10 mark and vs. Georgia 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 5:37 mark). Will at times not pick a delayed blitz from a LB (vs. Texas A& M 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 16 at the 9:37 mark).

He has good athleticism for a player his size. He has really good size and balance for an interior lineman. His pass blocking is solid as well. He’s quick off of the snap and generally keeps his pads down while extending and locking out the defender. He’s a good pass blocker but his lack of overall strength at this stage in his development is a major drawback as a run defender. He doesn’t move his man off of the ball enough to be considered a sturdy run blocker. Although he has good traits for pass blocking he doesn’t sustain blocks because defenders tend to slide out of his clutches. His overall strength isn’t going to improve to the point of him becoming a dominant player so his stock is limited because he doesn’t have any special athletic traits to compensate. He’s a good player who may provide value later in the draft if he can show himself to have better hand usage and the ability to move defenders more than he has. 5th-7th round.

#64 Mike Horton (rSr.) RG 6-4 325. Has appeared in 38 games with 20 starts (14 at RG and 6 at LG). Versatile. Has cross trained at C in practice as well as OG. Has excellent size for the position. Has long arms with great weight distribution from top to bottom. Plays with power and aggression as a run blocker. Overpowers DL with his strong hands. Gets very good push on defenders in close quarters in the run game. Anchors really well. Doesn’t get pushed back into the pocket once engaged with a defender as a pass blocker.

Suffered an injured left ankle on October 7, 2017 against Ole Miss. Missed the following two games due to the injury. Isn’t a good athlete. Lacks lateral mobility and quickness. Very slow feet. All of his movements appear to be lumbering but mostly glaring in space. Isn’t much of a pulling OG. Appears stiff when attempting to get out in space (vs. Georgia 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:01 mark). Can be easily avoided in space. Doesn’t latch on at a high rate on the second level. Doesn’t have good technique as a blocker. Does a lot of pushing and lunging. Loses his balance when confronted with having to move quickly from one direction to the other (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:07 mark). Loses balance when given any variation from a pass rusher in pass protection (vs. Georgia 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 3 at the 2:19 mark). Has poor balance when he has to move his feet in general (vs. Alabama 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 8:15 mark).

He has excellent size and strength but doesn’t possess much else as an OL. His lack of athleticism is only compounded by his lack of technique as a blocker. He doesn’t move well and his footwork often leaves him at a disadvantage at the snap of the ball. In his attempts to compensate for his lack of athleticism he over extends his feet to get into better position against a DL. This is where his balance issues start. He isn’t a zone blocking OG and although he’s more than likely stronger than the man lined up across from him he lacks the technique to win most of those interior battles. He’s at his most effective when a defender is lined up directly in front of him and remain in a phone booth. His lack of great agility, fluidity and flexibility will hurt his standing during the postseason and during the draft process if he’s a Combine invite. His bench press will be of great importance but with his long arms he may not have an impressive showing there either. He may really need to, if all else fails to have a stellar Pro Day in order for teams that are interested to go back and review his tape again. He isn’t a match for every offensive scheme because of his limited athletic profile but his size and strength are very redeeming qualities to have. 7th-UDFA.

#54 Kaleb Kim (rSr.) C 6-4 300. Has appeared in 17 games with 8 starts. Has very good size for the position. Decent athlete. Has good short area quickness. Displays solid strength at times. Will anchor at the point of attack. Plays the angles well. Gets in position quickly off of the snap to wall off the defender. Allows his back to get thru the hole he created with the angle. Solid shotgun snapper. Consistently snaps the ball to the QB with good placement.

Isn’t a fluid athlete in space. Feet appear slow when moving in space. Has to reset his feet in an attempt to block a defender in space (vs. Texas A& M 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 5:54 mark). Isn’t a very strong blocker at the point of attack. Doesn’t move defenders off of the ball (vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:56 mark). Gets bull rushed back into the pocket when defenders line up in the 0 technique (vs. Texas A& M 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 4 at the 13:15 mark, vs. Texas A & M 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 11 at the 3:00 mark, vs. Texas A& M 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:04 mark and vs. Alabama 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 6:57 mark). Feet tend to stop on contact. Doesn’t consistently play with good hand technique. Allows defenders into his chest far too often. Is on the ground too much. Gets ripped and thrown to the ground a lot (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 5:29 mark). Doesn’t move his feet or respond well to a variation in pass rush moves (vs. Alabama 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 1:46 mark). Doesn’t make the adjustment from snap to DL shooting the gap or LB blitzing quick enough (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 16 at the 9:36 mark and FS. Alabama 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 6:57 mark).

He’s a strong player but consistently displays a lack of functional football strength. He doesn’t get his momentum going forward in the trenches. He gets knocked back into the pocket a lot and is on the ground a lot as well. He never seems to be able to knock a defender off of the line and he never puts them on their backside either. He was directly responsible for his QB having to escape the pocket a good deal of the time that it occurred as a pass protector. His lack of lateral agility was directly responsible for him getting benched after two 4th quarter holding penalties against LSU on September 15, 2018. He can shotgun snap but this seems to be his one true good trait as an OL. He’s limited athleticism and the lack of strength makes him a highly unlikely next level prospect. UDFA.

#76 Prince Tega Wanogho (rSr.) OT 6-7 305. Has appeared in 36 games with 20 starts. Versatile. Has in game experience at both LT and RT. Has prototype size for the position. Has great height and really good weight distribution all throughout his frame. Has really long arms. Excellent athlete!!! Naturally talented and gifted in the athleticism department. Has excellent agility, fluidity and mobility. Has very good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.75-4.85 40 range). Has great balance and coordination. Has incredible strength. Moves defenders off of the ball as a run blocker (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:37 mark). Extremely fast and agile. Springs out of his stance. Gets out to the second level in a flash as a run blocker (vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:01 mark). Has the agility to maneuver in space and put a solid block on a defender (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 5:53 mark). A bonafide dancing bear. Very light on his feet. Has really quick feet in his kick slide. Gets to his spots fast. Doesn’t overcommit his weight to his left foot as a pass protector. Shifts and redirects his weight very well (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 11 at the 2:51 mark).

Suffered a fracture to his left tibia and fibula in January of 2015 as a high school senior. Had to take a medical redshirt due to the severity of the injury for the 2015 season while recovering. Still a relatively inexperienced football player. Started playing the sport as a senior in high school in 2015 and made the switch from DL to OT in July of 2016. Inexperience still shows a great deal in his technique at times. A bit sloppy in his technique. Displays poor hand placement. Lacks quiet hands. Hands flail out of his kick slide. Doesn’t consistently get his hands into the defenders chest. Allows the defender to slide out of his clutches (vs. Georgia 2028, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:35 mark). Looses his ability to steer and control them because of this. Doesn’t always display good footwork. Will make a misstep and get pushed back into the pocket as a pass protector (vs. Texas A& M 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 6:29 mark). Will at times throw technique out of the window altogether when confronted with a speed rusher to his outside shoulder (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 8:15 mark). Will unnecessarily lunge and reach at defenders (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 2 at the 4:10 mark). Misses blocks due to not staying at bay and allowing them to come towards him. Has a tendency to dip his head upon contact with a DL (vs. Georgia 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 3 at the 2:19 mark).

He’s a tremendous prospect from a size, speed and agility standpoint. He moves like a much smaller player. Has the feet of a basketball player which is a sport he used to play. His athleticism hasn’t been compromised since getting on campus and putting on a substantial amount of weight. He’s retained an elite level of athleticism which makes him a perfect fit at the LT position. He’s tailor made for the position but he isn’t close to a fully realized prospect. He needs reps, reps and more reps. He doesn’t have a lot of football under his belt and is still seeing a lot of things if not for the first time then close to it. He has to break free of the bad habits he’s formed though because his technique hasn’t improved to the point to where he’s a top flight LT prospect. He’s for sure a high upside player but he’s a developmental prospect at this stage in his development. He will do both good and bad things on the same play. He can get his feet over to defend against a pass rusher but his arms and hands aren’t in position for him to effectively block (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 4 at the 13:14 mark). Instead of his hands going up into the defenders chest his left arm tends to come around high and wide (vs. Georgia 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:19 mark, vs. Georgia 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 7 at the :34 mark, vs. Georgia 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 1:34 mark and vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 14:52 mark). These inconsistencies are constant to the point that they are habit and will be hard to break him out of. His athleticism will get him only so far so there’s no way around him needing to improve in order to be a mainstay on an OL for a decade or more. If he does make the necessary adjustments and improvements he’s a top flight LT but if he doesn’t he may very well be a bust very quickly. He’s a boom or bust player but that gamble on greatness may be too much for someone to overlook. He should test extremely well in all of the drills at the Combine which should cement his standing as a day one or day two prospect. Mid 1st round- early 3rd round.

#5 Derrick Brown (Sr.) DT 6-5 318. Has appeared in 40 games with 25 starts. Team leader. Versatile. Can line up anywhere from the 0-5 technique in a 3-4 defense and as a 3 technique in a 4-3. Has excellent size for the position. Has really long arms. Has exceptional brute strength. He bench presses over 420+ pounds and can squat 590+ pounds. Transfers speed to power really well. Applies the sled work in practice to the field of play. Gives OL a violent jolt backwards on contact. Will push OL back into the pocket (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 6:04 mark). Has very strong hands. Gets his hands on an OL one on one and pushes them back into the pocket. An exceptional athlete. Has cat like quickness and agility. A quick twitch athlete. Has very good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.85-4.95 40 range). Quick off of the snap. Can fire off of the ball and into an OL chest in a flash. Plays with a relentlessness. Has a high motor. Never gives up on a play. Gets his hands up to obstruct passing lanes if he can’t get to the QB (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 7 at the :53 mark). Will chase down a play from the backside 10 yards downfield and across the formation (vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:31 mark and vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the :55 mark). Can stack and shed to perfection on occasion (vs. LSU 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:51 mark) Will also stack, shed and chase down (vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & Goal at the 4:56 mark). Can quickly shoot gaps and make a play on the ball (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:36 mark). Gets an incredible push as a pass rusher with his bull rush (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 13 at the 2:31 mark).

Plays with an inconsistent pad level. Tends to rise straight up out of his stance (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:44 mark). Loses every time against OG’s who get underneath his pads and stay low (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 4:39 mark). Gets stood straight up upon contact. Stops his feet on contact when he’s locked up with an OL. Very ineffective against double teams (vs. LSU 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:22 mark, vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:57 mark, vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:49 mark, vs. Georgia 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:35 mark and vs. Georgia 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:57 mark). Doesn’t disengage from blocks quickly. Doesn’t use his hands much to fight off blocks. Tries to power thru OL on nearly every play. Doesn’t have many moves as a pass rusher. Doesn’t have great bend around the outside shoulder of OL (vs. Texas A & M 218, 4th quarter, 3rd & 7 at the :49 mark). Approaches blockers the same way on nearly every snap.

He’s an athletic marvel. Rare is the player who has this blend of great size, strength, speed, quickness and agility. He’s a disruptive force who is every teams OL’s toughest assignment every week. He’s impossible to handle when he keeps his pad level down. The issue is he doesn’t do it enough. When he stays low out of his stance he gets really good results. He doesn’t appear yet to trust in what his God given abilities will allow him to do. He doesn’t use his athleticism enough in conjunction with his strength to win his matchups. He does athletic things but doesn’t commit to them fully. He tends to reduce himself to a power player only and he can be so much more than that. He has the ability to be a disruptive force on passing downs as a pass rusher but he has yet to gain much traction in this area of his game. It will take him a while to adjust to the next level once he’s on a roster because he has to learn how to adjust to players who use good or great technique. He will be a workout warrior at the Combine/Pro Day and will be a pleasure during interviews because he’s so personable. He has all the upside in the world but he very well may have to learn to use his hands much better in order to become he player teams think he has the potential to become. He isn’t that player yet. He isn’t fully realized and it will take him time if it’s ever to really materialize. Early to mid 1st round.

#80 Sal Cannella (Sr.) WR/TE 6-5 232. Has appeared in 24 games with 1 start. CC transfer. Versatile. Has experience lined up at the X and Y positions. Decent athlete. Has decent straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.60-4.70 40 range). Has a solid frame with really long arms. Has a huge catch radius. Has decent jumping ability (vs. Washington 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 11:51 mark). Arm length gives him an advantage as an open field blocker. Latches on at a high rate in open spaces.

Hasn’t had much production in his career (15 catches, 142 yards and 3 TD’s). Isn’t a particularly good athlete. Isn’t very fluid or agile. Lacks short area quickness. Doesn’t show good route running ability. Doesn’t start with a good stance at the LOS. Doesn’t sink his hips or have the fluidity to gain separation. Doesn’t get any yards after the catch. Lacks quick and precise footwork. Runs his routes upright. Exposes his entire frame. Doesn’t break down and there is no stemming. Doesn’t sell his routes well at all. Tips off his routes with his shoulders. Doesn’t have any experience as a traditional in line TE. Isn’t a blocker at all. Doesn’t have good blocking technique. Has a thin frame. Has a narrow waist with thin thighs and calves. Doesn’t have much growth potential. Lacks the size and strength to be a capable blocker. Will drop an easy pass at times.

Has excellent size for the WR and TE positions. His greatest asset is his are length which helps him a great deal as a blocker on the perimeter. He latches on and is a good outside blocker. He can block smaller players but this is about all he’s shown that he can do. He hasn’t distinguished himself in any other way to this point in his career. He doesn’t possess any characteristics to classify himself as a TE and isn’t athletic enough or sound in his technique to be considered a viable next level prospect at the WR position. He’s run basic, decoy type routes where he’s not really involved as a receiving threat. He plays a lot in the slot and he isn’t a fit there because his size an lack of flexibility and suddenness don’t mesh well with the slot. He also lacks the explosiveness off of the LOS as an outside receiver either as a boundary or as a field receiver. His role won’t expand in his final season but with the snaps he does get he needs to become more of a presence and a factor in the offense in order to get looks during the draft process. He also needs to have an outstanding Pro Day workout as well. UDFA.

#91 Nick Coe (rJr.) OLB/DL 6-5 291. Has appeared in 25 games with 10 starts. Versatile. Has experience as a stand up OLB (Buck) in a 3-4, at DE in a 3-4, as a DE in a 4-3 as well as a DT in a 4-3. Will move from position to position along the formation from one play to the next. Has great size for the position. Has extremely long arms. Has a condor like wingspan. A decent athlete. Has good speed for a bigger player. Has a great deal of strength and power. A man mover. Has very heavy hands. Gets really good push upfield with sheer power as a pass rusher (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 2:15 mark). Plays disciplined. Stays home in backside pursuit (vs. Washington 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 5 at the :22 mark). Can be a stout run defender. Gets his arms extended on an OL and can stack and shed them (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 4:38 mark).

Suffered a dislocated right wrist and ligament damage against Georgia on November 10, 2018. Missed the following weeks game against Liberty on November 17, 2018 as a result. Had surgery on the wrist the week after the Alabama game. Missed the Music City Bowl against Purdue on December 28, 2018 as a result. Isn’t an explosive athlete. Isn’t quick or fast at the snap (vs. Washington 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 9 at the 10:54 mark and vs. Tennessee 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 6:14 mark). Lacks any element of explosiveness. Has a really stiff lower body. Very slow to recover from a cut block (vs. LSU 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 4 at the :45 mark, vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 12:58 mark and vs. Tennessee 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 12:22 mark). Isn’t flexible as a pass rusher. Doesn’t have good bend around the outside shoulder of the OT (vs. Washington 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 3:48 mark). Doesn’t have any pass rush moves. Lacks creativity as a pass rusher (vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & Goal at the 4:15 mark, vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:30 mark and vs. Tennessee 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 19 at the 8:02 mark). Doesn’t have any variation of movement. A straight forward only type pass rusher. Really inconsistent with his technique. Has a tendency to rise straight up and out out of his stance. Plays with an inconsistent pad level. Allows OT’s and TE’s under his pads and loses every time. Stops his feet on contact at times (vs. Washington 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 13 at the 2:22 mark and vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:57 mark). Doesn’t have experience dropping back into coverage. Has zero ball awareness on RPO’s (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 5 at the 14:14 mark).

He is as strong as any player out there pound for pound in the upper body. He has gotten production solely off of his upper body strength on the collegiate level. He’s a good athlete for his size but he doesn’t have the next level upside for the OLB role he has played . He has added some size to his frame and will be more of a DL moving forward which is where his chances of being a viable next level prospect truly are. He’s best suited for DT in a 4-3 or at DE in a 3-4 with the idea of him being a disruptor who will push and collapse the pocket and stand up against the run. Any expectation that he’s a pass rusher or to put him in a role to get at the QB would play against his strengths. He isn’t a pass rusher at all. He could get a few because of his strength and power to push OL back but he isn’t quick or fast and is very tight. His behind the line production came from him going unimpeded and unblocked upfield. Other than that his production towards the QB came from good coverage behind him or from the QB holding the ball too long. Even as a run defender he has to learn to consistently keep his pads down or else he will never will on any snap against a good interior OL. He has a ways to go as far as his technique and pad level and playing with his hand on the ground but he has the strength and extreme level of power already needed at the next level. He will test very well in the strength testing department at the Combine but struggle in the agility drills. He could be a solid next level player but it isn’t a given considering his physical limitations. Late 4th-6th round.

#3 Marlon Davidson (Sr.) DE 6-3 278. Has appeared in 39 games with 39 starts. A solid ST performer. Specializes in blocking FG’s. Versatile. Has lined up as a stand up pass rusher at OLB in a 3-4 , DE in a 3-4, and at DE and DT in a 4-3. Good athlete. Has really good agility for a player his size. Displays little to no stiffness in his pursuit of the ball. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.75-4.85 40 range). Has a high motor. Plays with a relentlessness. Will chase a play down downfield (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 9:07 mark). A very stout run defender. Keeps his pad level down and doesn’t give up ground as a run defender.

Suffered an undisclosed right knee injury in the early stages of fall camp in August of 2017. Missed the game against Mercer on September 16, 2017 as a result. Lacks a true position. He’s a bit of a tweener size wise. Doesn’t have ideal size for the DE position in a 3-4 as well as at DT in a 4-3. Doesn’t fit the athletic profile at OLB in a 3-4 or at DE in a 4-3. Lacks lower body explosiveness. Isn’t particularly quick or fast off of the snap as a pass rusher. Lacks pass rush moves. Doesn’t have a game plan as a pass rusher for the most part (vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:29 mark). Only really ever attempts to go thru the OT as a pass rusher (vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:40 mark). Takes too wide an angle around the OT’s outside shoulder at times (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 10:29 mark). Gets stuck to blocks a lot. Doesn’t disengage in time to make a play on the ball consistently (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:28 mark). Never requires a double team. Gets managed very well by blocking TE’s (vs. Georgia 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:24 mark). Forces his way upfield on every snap. Doesn’t distinguish between run or pass. Seems to only attempt to shoot gaps as opposed to stacking in shedding. Undisciplined against the RPO. Doesn’t take the time to read and react.

He has a great deal of natural talent along with rare versatility along the DL. His versatility gives him added value because he can play some 3-4 DE as well as at 3 technique in a 4-3. That talent though seems untapped because he’s so raw in his technique. He doesn’t use his hands well when engaged with OL or keep them off of his frame. With his skill set and talent he may be drafted to play immediately but it may take time for him to learn the ropes. He isn’t a ready made player and he must be brought along with patience in order for him to reach his potential. At this stage in his development he has yet to show that he is a playmaker or a difference maker in any way whether it be as a pass rusher or as a run defender. He needs a great deal of technique refinement in order to get drafted in the early stages of the draft but it very well may play out that he gets drafted very low if at all with the level of play that he has shown. His versatility is a big plus but his fate may be decided at the Combine during his workouts. Late 5th-7th round.

#9 Kam Martin (Sr.) RB 5-10 195. Has appeared in 35 games with 6 starts. Cousin is former NFL RB Jamaal Charles who was a 3rd round pick by the Kansas City Chiefs in the 2008 NFL Draft. Good athlete. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.40-4.50 40 range). Runs with a forward lean. Will absorb a defenders hit and pick up an extra yard after contact when he has good momentum going. A willing runner between the tackles. Protects the ball with both arms when running thru the hole. Has soft hands as a pass catcher. A very QB friendly pass catcher. Will make himself available by coming back to the ball (vs. Washington 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 9:15 mark).

Missed the game against Texas A & M on November 3, 2018 due to an ankle injury. Has had a very inconsistent workload. Has very modest career carries and production (221 carries, 1,231 yards and 6 TD’s with 15 catches, 172 yards and 1 TD). Isn’t an every down RB. Undersized by every down back standards. Doesn’t run with strength or power. Tends to stop his legs on contact. Can’t push a pile or fight thru tackles. Isn’t an elusive runner. Doesn’t have moves to create space to avoid tacklers in the open field. Doesn’t have great vision as a runner. Runs a very limited route tree out of the backfield. Doesn’t have really good awareness in pass protection (vs. Southern Miss 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:27 mark). Lacks the functional football strength to hold up as a reliable blocker (vs. Southern Miss 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 20 at the 13:04 mark). Has really bad blocking technique when he is engaged with a defender.

He’s a very good athlete. He has the speed and hands to go along with his ability to run the ball so he can be classified as an all purpose back. He at times has lined up in the slot so he does have some, not a great deal but some experience as a receiver so he has a level of versatility. What he doesn’t have is a level of consistent snaps or productivity when he does get a cluster of snaps. He has been one part of a very talented RB depth chart so his carries have been limited to an extent. He’s not an expert down back because he lacks the size, size potential and strength that he would need to carry as a lead back. He isn’t a second back or a complimentary back either because of his lack of real functional football strength as a blocker. He doesn’t do a good job of first identifying where the blitz is coming from until it’s too late and when he does he can sustain a solid block. He gets knocked back on almost every head on blocking encounter. He most definitely won’t be the top RB on the depth chart this upcoming season and there aren’t any guarantees he’s the second one either he may have tough time getting the same level of carries and production he got in 2018 with the talent that is in the RB room. With his inability to distinguish himself so far and with the depth on the team his biggest hope is that he has a stellar Pro Day workout. He has added some size to his frame and if the size doesn’t take away from his athleticism he could potentially get some looks after his Pro Day. He doesn’t get drafted but a team with an eye on a versatile player who could potentially play in the backfield and in the slot may look to him at some point post draft. UDFA.

#24 Daniel Thomas (Sr.) SS 5-11 209. Has appeared in 38 games with 14 starts. Versatile. Has experience at both SS and FS as well as at NCB. Has a high football IQ. He’s always where he should be and in proper position to make a play on the ball. Plays assignment sound football. Good athlete. Closes really fast on the ball downhill. Closes as fast as a heat seeking missile at times (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the :22 mark). Takes good angles when moving downhill towards the ball as a run defender (vs. Texas A & M 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:51 mark). Very evasive against OL and TE’s close to the LOS. Shows good timing as a blitzer (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 4 at the 2:36 mark and vs. Texas A & M 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 22 at the :14 mark).

Doesn’t have great straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.55-4.60 40 range). Isn’t a fluid athlete. Lacks lateral agility. Shows stiffness when changing direction in the open field at times (vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:30 mark, vs. Georgia 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 12 at the 14:08 mark and vs. Alabama 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:39 mark). Remains upright in his backpedal. Doesn’t get good depth in his drops in coverage. Doesn’t have great range on the back end. Never gets over to help a CB on passes downfield. Isn’t an instinctive last line defender in pass coverage. Doesn’t always wrap up as a tackler. Will at times attempt to put a hit on a ball carrier/receiver and miss a tackle. Gets tricked on the RPO at times (vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:10 mark).

He’s a very smart player who can line the defense up and get them into their proper position. He puts himself in position to make plays himself by being where he should always be. He’s strong when he’s close to the LOS as a run defender. He takes on blocks well and can evade OL and TE’s in time to make a play on the ball. He also shows that he has a capability to blitz that should be further exploited. He closes hard and fast on the QB and does have an effect on them. He’s a solid tackler as well when he does wrap up. He does a lot of things well but he doesn’t have ideal size, speed and athleticism. His size isn’t an issue because he plays in a way that he overcomes that but he doesn’t have an one special trait as a SS. He isn’t much of a help to his CB’s because he can’t get over the top in time to be of help. He can’t do it from a speed or athletic standpoint and it doesn’t help that he isn’t a very instinctive pass defender. He doesn’t see or have a feel for what the QB is going to do or even read them. He also doesn’t always wrap up as a tackler so he will miss a few. He won’t test well at the Combine if he’s invited in the agility drills but should do really well with his knowledge base and learning capabilities. He will have to have a very strong Pro Day workout in order to have some positive momentum heading into the draft. There’s always a place for versatile DB’s who know how to play the game from a mental aspect. He should come close to making a roster after the final cuts are made for a 53 man roster. He’s a good player with value but he will have to show a more complete and capable player as a pass defender. Late 6th-UDFA.

#1 Big Kat Bryant (Jr.) OLB/DE 6-5 247. Has appeared in 25 games with 3 starts. Has football bloodlines. Cousin Montravius Adams played at Auburn (2013-2016) and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the 3rd round of the 2017 NFL Draft. Versatile. Has experience lined up at OLB, DE as well as DT as a pass rusher. Has exceptional size for the position. Looks the part. Has extremely long arms with the wingspan of a condor. Good athlete. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.60-4.70 40 range). Has a good burst off of the snap. Relentless in pursuit of the ball. Doesn’t give up on a play. Will chase a play down from the backside (vs. Washington 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:39 mark). Has some experience dropping back into coverage.

Has minor right shoulder surgery in February of 2019. Hasn’t had much career production (23 tackles, 6.5 tackles for loss and 5.5 sacks). Isn’t a top flight athlete. Isn’t very quick or agile. Doesn’t have fluid hips. A bit stiff from the waist down (vs. Tennessee 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:20 mark). Awkward and clumsy when attempting to change direction (vs. Tennessee 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 14 at the 7:23 mark). Can’t get out of the way of a cut block. Lower body crumbles and he doesn’t recover quickly (vs. Southern Miss 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 11 at the 4:39 mark). Lacks refinement as a pass rusher. Doesn’t have any pass rush moves. Only ever attempts to get around the OT’s outside shoulder. Isn’t as quick or as fast off of the line with his hand on the ground at DE. Usually the last DL off of the snap. Doesn’t use his hands well. Once he’s engaged with an OL or TE he’s blocked and out of the play for good. Lacks functional football strength. Gets outmuscled on nearly every snap including by much smaller blockers (vs. Southern Miss 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 18 at the 15:00 mark).

He has the type of size and speed that is very enticing. He fits the profile of what you are looking for in an OLB/DE prospect to a T. His upfield burst can be impressive at times. He has incredible natural gifts but he is extremely raw. He’s a one note type player to this point and he needs to make great strides in all facets of his game. He isn’t much of a pass rusher despite his speed and he isn’t a factor as a run defender because he lacks strength and technique. He doesn’t know how to use his hands to gain an advantage at all so he continuously runs into the same road blocks play after play (vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 6 at the 9:27 mark). It appears really easy for OL and TE’s to neutralize him. He comes with a lot of speed and force as a rusher but with his lack of functional football strength his momentum is immediately stopped. He surprisingly doesn’t jolt any blockers back at all. He has a long way to go because at this stage in his development he doesn’t show much of anything that would be considered next level worthy. The upside is there but he has to get a lot better very quickly. He has to exhaust his eligibility because he’s a long term developmental project and at this stage he isn’t much of a next level prospect. Doesn’t declare.

#4 Noah Igbinoghene (Jr.) CB/KR 5-11 200. Has appeared in 27 games with 9 starts. Mother and father were Olympic track athletes. Mother, Faith won the bronze medal in the 400 meter relay at the 1992 Barcelona games for Nigeria. Father, Festus competed in the triple jump in the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia for his native Nigeria. Noah is a product of his genetics. A excellent athlete. Has a very natural athleticism. Has great speed (appears to run in the 4.35-4.40 40 range). Can run stride for stride with any and every receiver. Has lower body explosiveness. Shows really good mobility and fluidity. Smooth and agile in his backpedal. Flips his hips with zero stiffness. Transitions out of it seamlessly. Has experience in both press and zone coverages. Disguises his blitz very well.

Still very raw at CB. Moved to the position in March of 2018. Appears to be a bit delayed in his reaction time to the WR’s move upfield off of the LOS. Lacks awareness of the football in coverage. Doesn’t have the feel to track the man and the ball downfield, especially on back shoulder fades (vs. LSU 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:21 mark, vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & Goal at the 4:16 mark and vs. Georgia 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & Goal at the 14:02 mark). Never seems to get his head around. Has tunnel vision on the receiver he covers. Doesn’t look for the or see the ball at all as a run defender (vs. Georgia 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 3:18 mark). Will get caught on his heels from time to time. Gets too hands on in coverage. Has picked up multiple pass interference calls because of his hands. Small in stature. Has small bone structure with short arms. Doesn’t have much room for growth. Size is best suited for NCB. He doesn’t come off of blocks well against receivers on the outside.

He’s an exceptional athlete. There isn’t much athletically that he can’t do. His ability to move so fluidly added to the incredible gift of speed that he has makes him a top flight athlete for the CB position. He’s quick twitched and can keep up with just about anybody because he’s athletically never really out of a play. He has a great deal of upside but he’s still very raw and inexperienced and it shows. His technique is aesthetically pleasing at times but upon deep examination he does have a lot of issues to clean up. He reacts too late at times to the receivers release at the line an he’s behind instead of ahead of the game. His hands have cost him some. He can touch early but he tends to get handsy downfield. This issue stems from him not being secure with knowing where the ball is. He never seems to know where it is and can not only continue to get pass interference penalties called because of his hands but also because he tends to face guard. Awareness of where the ball is may never come along with more as more reps because he is very much far behind in that regard. He has the athletic characteristics to dazzle at a the Combine and Pro Day but that day will have to wait. He’s still inexperienced and needs as much time as he can possibly get at his still new position. No level of athleticism can overcome his lack of experience especially at a position where he’s out on an island alone. Doesn’t declare.

#55 T. D. Moultry (Jr.) OLB 6-2 243. Has appeared in 26 games with 0 starts. Versatile. Has experience at both OLB and DE. A good athlete. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.60-4.70 40 range). Displays quickness off of the snap as a pass rusher at times. Shows the ability to be stout as a run defender.

Has very little career production (26 tackles, 5 tackles for loss and 3 sacks). Has an inconsistent get off at the snap as a pass rusher. Will at times appear slow off of the snap. Doesn’t have any pass rush moves. Isn’t creative in his pursuit of the QB. Goes to the outside shoulder only. Has an unrefined spin move (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 5 at the 5:32 and vs. Ole Miss 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:18 mark). Doesn’t use his hands well. Rarely uses his hands or extend his arms to keep OL off of his frame. Will drive into OL with his body as a pass rusher (vs. Georgia 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 13:50 mark). Doesn’t stack and shed as a run defender. Doesn’t disengage in time enough to make a play on the ball (vs. Georgia 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 1 at the 10:37 mark). Doesn’t fight hard once engaged with an OL at times (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 1 at the 6:52 mark and vs. Ole Miss 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the :31 mark).

He has good straight line speed. He has some chase down ability. Although he has natural athleticism he hasn’t shown that he has good instincts. He’s the same player whether it be a run or pass play. He will run upfield towards the OT’s outside shoulder or straight at them and it will be a road block. He may be better suited for the ILB position moving forward. He hasn’t been able to show off his athletic abilities or lack there of. He hasn’t shown if he has anything but a good straight ahead athlete. If he does have good lateral agility he could project to be a better ILB than OLB. He currently at his first two years trajectory doesn’t have any next level upside either at OLB or DE. He has two years of eligibility remaining so there could be room for a great deal of improvement but the reality is he’s currently not playing the position he should be playing if he has any chance at the next level. Doesn’t declare.

#15 Jordyn Peters (Jr.) DB 6-1 195. Has appeared in 27 games with 3 starts. An excellent ST performer. Blocked 3 punts during the 2018 season. Has great size for the position. Has long arms and legs. A good athlete. Has tremendous jumping ability.

Suffered an undisclosed right ankle injury in March of 2019. Missed all of spring practice as a result. Doesn’t have much career production (48 tackles, 5 tackles for loss and 2 sacks). Isn’t sound in his technique. Has some hip stiffness. Doesn’t sink his hips in his backpedal. Will remain high and not be balanced when changing direction quickly (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 14:31 mark). Tends to lung and grab at receivers at the LOS (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 6 at the 12:45 mark). Doesn’t display much functional football strength. Always gets knocked back off of the ball when first engaged with a blocker (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 3 at the 6:48 mark and vs. Mississippi State 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 1 at the 5:48 mark). He’s a drag down tackler (vs. Mississippi State 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:16 mark). Has a wiry frame with little bulk on his frame. Has a thin waist with narrow thighs and calves.

He’s a good athlete who has done really well as a ST. He has already carved out a niche as a gunner and as a punt blocker. There’s a great deal of value there but his calling card would have to be as a DB. He hasn’t distinguished himself as such yet though. He doesn’t make plays because he lacks the strength to fight thru blocks. He in fact gets knocked back a lot as a run defender. His technique as a DB is lacking also. He has to improve his backpedal which is something he doesn’t seem to utilize much. His change of direction isn’t sound either being as though he has some stiffness as a mover. He does have time to improve but he needs to play a lot over these next two seasons in order to gain any traction as a next level prospect. He needs to have a defined role too. He is currently a backup at the NCB/Star position so he has to overcome the depth chart in order to begin to make a dent as a defender. Doesn’t declare.

#28 JaTarvious "Boobee" Whitlow (rSo.) RB 6-0 210. Has appeared in 13 games with 5 starts. Good athlete. Has good mobility, agility and flexibility. An elusive and evasive runner. Tends to slide out of defenders clutches at times. Has really good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.45-4.52 40 range). Runs with a good pad level thru the hole. Has really good balance thru contact at times (vs. Arkansas 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 10:15 mark, vs. Ole Miss 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 8:13 mark, vs. Ole Miss 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:58 mark and vs. Georgia 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:01 mark). Displays good patience and timing as a runner at times (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 5 at the 11:27 mark). A natural hands catcher. Has soft hands as a pass catcher. Turns upfield quickly after the catch (vs. Ole Miss 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 5:31 mark).

Hasn’t been healthy for any consistent stretch of time so far. Suffered an undisclosed ankle injury in August of 2017. The injury lingered and he took a medical redshirt as a result. Suffered a left shoulder injury against Southern Mississippi in the 2nd quarter on September 29, 2018. Missed the remainder of the game as a result. Reinjured the left shoulder against Tennessee in the 3rd quarter on October 13, 2018. Missed the remainder of the game as a result. Suffered an undisclosed right leg injury in the 3rd quarter against Ole Miss on October 20, 2018. Missed the remainder of the game as a result. Doesn’t have much career production with only 165 total touches (150 carries, 787 yards and 6 TD’s with 15 catches, 173 yards and 2 TD’s). Doesn’t protect the ball with both hands thru the hole (vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:53 mark). Isn’t a refined route runner out of the backfield. Only runs two basic routes. Doesn’t sell them well. Doesn’t have good vision as a pass protector (vs. Arkansas 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & Goal at the :57 mark). Doesn’t have good blocking technique (vs. Arkansas 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & Goal at the 1:09 mark).

He’s a really good athlete. He has an excellent blend of speed and elusiveness as a runner. He has really good hands as a pass catcher as well. He has just about ideal size for a RB. He’s still a very much unproven player at this stage in his development. He’s light on career carries. He has had multiple nagging injuries that have prevented him from gaining much traction. He’s carried the ball 20 times only once so far. The teams running by committee approach has taken away from his productivity as well. This all brings into question if he’s capable of being a back who can shoulder the load. He’s big and strong but isn’t an aggressive or forceful runner or a bell cow type. His forward momentum comes to a halt and/or he gets knocked back when running in the areas up the middle in the A gap. He has to continue to get stronger as an in between the tackles runner. He also needs a lot of work on his blocking technique as well as his ability to see blitzers and defenders who beat the OL in general. His versatility as a runner and as a pass catcher are extremely valuable but he needs to stay healthy and get much better at every aspect of the RB position. He’s a very naturally gifted player but he may declare before he’s ready and his draft stock may suffer. 6th-UDFA.

Non draft eligible player(s) of note:

#5 Anthony Schwartz (So.) WR 6-0 179. Has appeared in 13 games with 5 starts. An exceptional athlete!!! A two sport athlete. Plays football and runs track and field. Arguably college footballs fastest player. Has effortless elite level speed. Will break away from a defender even when he doesn’t have the angle (vs. Tennessee 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 3:41 mark). Had more rushing attempts (25) than he did receptions (22) but him having the ball in his hands in any form makes him a home run threat every time he touches the ball.

#18 Seth Williams (So.) WR 6-3 224. Has appeared in 13 games with 9 starts. Good athlete. Really big, strong and imposing. Has excellent jumping ability. Is at his best as a red zone threat. Can box out a defender and/or high point the ball really well. Has experience as a big slot receiver but has worked on the outside and will be more of a focal point in the offense moving forward.



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